The Future of Law (Part 5): The Democratization of the Law (Cont’d.)

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We’ve looked at the ethos of the legal profession before. Here’s that definition again:

Ethos:  the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community
as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.

Democratization has its own ethos. Its characteristic spirit is a popularized impatience, a marketplace riot in which “power to the people” pushes aside the traditional gatekeepers (lawyers) of specialized knowledge (the law). We looked last time at some of the beliefs and aspirations undergirding the democratization of knowledge, and the kinds of philosophical debate they generate.

It’s one thing when lawyers take the law in directions we didn’t anticipate (like what happened when RICO and HIPAA drifted from their originally intended moorings); it’s quite another when consumers and non-lawyers do that. (HIPAA’s original intent:  “to make it easier for people to keep health insurance, protect the confidentiality and security of healthcare information and help the healthcare industry control administrative costs.”  RICO’s intent:  to provide for criminal and civil redress “for acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization.”)

The law might have seen it coming. Democratization often creates high leverage events that seem sudden — e.g. the Arab Spring — but there’s usually a backstory of chronic popular discontent stonewalled by those in power, until one day enough is enough and the trend busts through.

In the case of law, a significant component of the backstory was chronic consumer dissatisfaction. For example, clients have been unhappy with hourly billing (and other fee practices) for a long time. (Billable hours are no picnic for lawyers, either.) Or consider the well-documented client dissatisfaction with the litigation process:  e.g., this 2002 article about “just how pernicious litigation is for the average non-repeat player,” or this 2008 article about the problems judges face when litigants represent themselves. The latter notes that “These trends present real and significant challenges to a legal system designed for representation by trained advocates.” That pretty well sums up democratization’s impact on the law.

This week’s prediction:  the legal democratization megatrend will spawn several powerful derivative trends that will erode the ethos of the law and the legal profession, in favor of a push to outcomes unencumbered by traditional legal process.  For example, we can expect:

  • A break from sole and perhaps even primary reliance on the sacrosanct cornerstone of precedential appellate authority in legal decision-making.
  • Non-traditional practitioners executing commercial transactions without what we would consider adequate contractual consideration, and resolving disputes without regard to historical evidentiary strictures (who cares about — or for that matter understands — hearsay anyway?).
  • Along the way, we’ll witness the continued diminution of the economic value of the knowledge base and skillset traditionally learned in law school and developed in the early years of law practice.

There will be other derivative trends as well; each will have gentler and more extreme versions. We’ll look at some of those in coming posts. Meanwhile, the debate about who can practice law better — the experts, or the empowered people — will rage on, mostly in vain. Democratization is a juggernaut that already can’t be stopped, and — in the law anyway — it doesn’t even have a full head of steam yet.

Author: Kevin Rhodes

Kevin Rhodes has been a lawyer for over 30 years. Drawing on insights gathered from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, and psychology, and also from his personal experiences as a practicing lawyer and a “life athlete,” he’s on a mission to bring wellbeing to the people who learn, teach, and practice the law.

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